Banana Pineapple Bread Loaf...

Banana is one of the favorite fruits of most Pinoys. It is available all year round and is affordable. Banana is very rich in fiber and has natural sugars like fructose, sucrose and glucose. Eating 2 bananas will give you enough energy in doing a very active one and a half work-out. You can also fight depression by just eating banana. It doesn’t mean your turning to a monkey being happy having a banana, but with its trytophan protein content and being converted to serotonin, making you more relax and helping you to have a better feeling and improves you to a happier mood. Banana is high in iron which fights anemia. It is also a great method in punching blood pressure. It helps reduce the risk of stroke and blood pressure. And with banana’s high in potassium content, it helps to boost your brain power. My aunt sent me an email regarding bananas with dark patches on its yellow skin. Most of us prefer those perfect yellow skin, but a Japanese research says that yellow skin bananas with dark spots on it are 8 times effective in enhancing property of white blood cells and enhancing the immunity of the body. Their recommendation is to eat 1 to 2 banana a day to improve our body’s immunity to diseases like colds and flu. No wonder we all love bananas for they give us a reason to be loved. Even the overriped bananas shouldn’t be thrown in the garbage. They are best to be used in you banana breads like this BANANA PINEAPPLE BREAD LOAF, CHOCO BANANA MUFFINS and BANANA LEMON BREAD. BANANA PINEAPPLE BREAD LOAF 3 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups white sugar 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tbsp. baking powder 3 cups mashed...

Ginisang Togue (Sauteed Monggo Sprout)...

Cooking MONGGO SPROUTS or TOGUE always brings me back to my grade school days. I remember my Science teacher asked the class to bring some monggo beans for an experiment. Fascinated and excited as I was, I brought lots of monggo sprouts next day. We placed the seeds on a pot of soil and poured with little water, placed under the sun and the next day, my monggo beans became monggo sprouts. Some of my classmates’ experiment was a fail but it didn’t matter. All of us graduated elementary. And I now cook monggo sprouts. I sometimes could hardly find monggo sprouts or togue in our wet market but good thing, Robinson’s market seem to always have them in their vegetables section. GINISANG TOGUE (Sauteed Monggo Sprout) cooking oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed 1 onion, peeled and sliced 1/4 kilo pork, sliced 1/2 kilo togue, washed and drained soy sauce sugar salt pepper Heat pan over medium heat. Add oil and pork. Cook until pork turns light brown. Add garlic and onion. Saute until aromatic. Add togue. Cook for 5-7 minutes. Then add water, about a cup. Bring to boil. Season with soy sauce, sugar, salt and pepper. Serve your GINISANG TOGUE with steaming white...

Lumpiang Gulay (Fried Vegetable Lumpia)...

Still Colby has no classes since Pangasinan is still signal # 1 with typhoon Juaning. we are so thankful that we are not so devastated with rain and wind of Juaning but our prayers to those who are badly affected of the typhoon. Today is a lazy day with the rainy weather but I still want to busy myself in the kitchen. Then a weird hungry voice whispered to my ears, but well it was just my hungry tummy shouting at me to fry a snack for a change. My kids and I usually have cookies, breads and biscuits for merienda but this time we will have vegetables. Yes, vegetables for a snack. LUMPIANG GULAY (Fried Vegetable Lumpia) is a lumpia-wrapped sauteed Baguio vegetables like sayote, Baguio beans, carrots and singkamas (Turnips), and meat. It is great merienda bite and even eaten best with rice. To fight the oily bite, dip the Lumpiang Gulay with vinegar, salt, sugar and onion. I have been long dreaming a home-cooked Lumpiang Gulay but with a mom’s busy day, slicing, wrapping (which is my most tedious part) and lastly frying won’t fit in. Finally, I get to cook them this time since kids and I are stucked at home. You may also try LUMPIANG SHANGHAI for a meaty lumpia filling. LUMPIANG GULAY (Fried Vegetable Lumpia) for the filling: oil to saute 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 large onion, peeled and minced 1/4 kilo ground or minced pork 1 sayote, peeled and thinly sliced 1-2 carrots, peeled and thinly sliced handful of Baguio Beans, thinly sliced, ends removed 1 large singkamas, peeled and thinly sliced salt pepper Heat a litlle oil in a pan. Saute garlic and onions until aromatic. Add pork, cook until browned. Add the...

Nilagang Baka (Beef Stew)...

We have a cold weather due typhoon Juaning. PAGASA declared that Pangasinan is signal # 2 so automatically no classes for pre-school and elementary schools therefore I got extra time to cruise with kids and cook a tough hearty soup, NILAGANG BAKA (BEEF STEW), to give us a warm this rainy day. Easy to cook but tough to tender. Hihi. NILAGA is best known soup dish of Pinoys. Nilaga is a boiled dish of meats like pork, chicken, beef and even fish. It is trouble-free dish since you just have to put in water in your pot, boil it and plunge the meat, wait until tender, dunk your favorite vegetables and season to make a very tasty soup. Some prefer cooking this dish with beef bone marrows but I had second thoughts of buying them since I am lately cutting Royce’s cholesterol intake. I also added some Saging na Saba to give a little sweet flavor to make the dish more kid-friendly and even more nutritious. My mom once suggested me to add some slices of chorizo de bilbao in my Nilagang Baka. At first, I was hesitant to add Spanish Sausage in my all-Pinoy dish, but truly Mom knows best. It laced my Nilaga dish with garlic, pimenton, cumin and oregano mixture of taste. Yes, any Nilaga dish is very easy but what makes this NILAGANG BAKA tough is the grueling 2-3 hours of boiling the beef chunks. I want my beef chunks to be effortlessly pieced with spoon and fork and stress-free when chewing the meat. Unfortunately, this Nilagang Baka dish will be just so easy if I can only find where my pressure cooker regulator is. If you want to make you Nilagang Baka more creamy, you can mash the potatoes...

Shrimp Omelette (Tortang Hipon)...

OMELETTE or Omelet is a meal made from beaten eggs quickly cooked with oil or butter. Omelette is usually folded with fillings like ham, sausage, hotdog, red bell pepper, onions, or ham. Adding milk, cream, mayonaisse helps the omelette to a more fluffly texture. With my desire to prepare a good meal without spending much, TORTANG HIPON was a great breakfast dish to be served with hot rice. At first, I was hesistant to serve this to my son, Colby, for it was his first time to eat small shrimps. But when he didn’t ask what it was and the only trouble will be if he complains on its taste. Fortunately, he had no leftovers, no complains. Colby loved it! I guess I will be cooking SHRIMP OMELETTE or TORTANG ALAMANG again soon. SMALL SHRIMP OMELETTE (TORTANG ALAMANG) oil for frying 2 cups alamang (small shrimps) 1 large minced onion 3 cloves minced garlic 3 large eggs, beaten 3 tbsp. flour salt pepper Place alamang in a colander, wash with running water and drain. Put in a large bowl, add all the remaining ingredients except oil and mix. Place pan over medium heat. Pour oil. Put about 3 tablespoons of alamang mixture into the pan. Fry, let it sit and flip to brown the other side. Enjoy your SHRIMP OMELETTE or TORTANG ALAMANG with catsup and steaming white...

Fruits on Sticks

My mom and I went to her friend’s birthday dinner party last night and this FRUITS ON STICKS on the dessert table caught my attention. Apart from the usual fruits served on occassions, this is a great idea for a more appealing and for a perfect summer spirit. All you need is a bunch of different fruits with assorted colors like strawberries, grapes, pineapples, melons, banana. Choose fruits with attractive colors and you can also match up the colors with the party theme. Peel the fruits if necessary. Cut fruits according to your desired size but consider the shape to be cut so the fruits can remain as they are. Like grapes and strawberries are mostly usually served as a whole since they are small and pleasant without cutting. You may cut mangoes, pineapples, melons and watermelons in flower, heart, cubes, semi-circle, cirle shapes. You can use different lenghts of sticks for your Fruits on Sticks like barbecue sticks, toothpicks and any stick that is food grade. Put in few pieces of fruits on the stick and dip into orange or pineapple juice. Just your creative hands to make designs. Use a wrapped styro foam or a cabbage head for your base. Put in your fruits on stick. Make sure the whole design is balanced and proportioned. Now you can serve your very own FRUITS ON STICKS on your dessert...

Fried Adobong Baboy

FRIED ADOBONG BABOY is just a fried version of Royce’s Adobong Baboy. I just only lessen the water and seasonings like soy sauce and vinegar. It is also called Crispy Adobong Baboy. The technique in cooking this recipe is to stir them constantly and cooking it on a very high heat to let the sauce evaporate quickly and to let the meat absorb the sauce easily. FRIED ADOBONG BABOY 1 tbsp. cooking oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed 2 medium onion, peeled and sliced thinly 1 kilo pork belly, sliced into cubes 1/2 cup soy sauce 1 cup water 3 bay leaves (laurel leaves) black peppercorns (about 8-10 pieces) 1/4 cup vinegar 1/2 cup brown sugar salt Heat oil in a medium frying pan. Add garlic and onion. Saute for about 1 minute. Add pork and cook until meat turns light brown, about 5 minutes. Add soy sauce, water, laurel leaves and black peppercorns. Bring to simmer, cook until meat is tender, about 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, add vinegar and brown sugar. Bring to full simmer until sauce is being absorbed by meat. You may add little oil so meat may be fried in it. Don’t forget to leave a small amount of the thick sauce for your...

Pinoy Beef Brisket

Sunday for me is the best time to cook beef since it demands longer cooking time compare to that of pork and chicken. But if you have a pressure cooker at home, it will cut your cooking time in half. There are many ways of cooking PINOY BEEF BRISKET and the best method is to cook them slow and moist to maximize flavor and tenderness. Brisket is a cut of meat from the lower chest or breast of beef. Royce thought that we are expecting some visitors because I was cooking this dish. It was like a big feast for him and Colby indulging the Beef Brisket, and it was too for Caleb, though he only had the sauce of Beef Brisket on his rice. My Pinoy Beef Brisket recipe has a very similar taste to a Pork in Barbecue Sauce, a combination of sweet and salty flavor in a savory tender beef. PINOY BEEF BRISKET 2 tbsp. cooking oil 1 small ginger, peeled and minced 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 medium onion, peeled and minced 1 kilo beef brisket, sliced into cubes 2 tbsp. lemon juice 1/2 cup soy sauce 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 cup sugar 3 cups water salt black peppercorns In a large saucepan, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add ginger and garlic. Then add onion, saute until aromatic. Add beef, saute until beef turns brown. Add water, soy sauce and peppercorns. Bring to boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered for 1 hour. Then add, lemon juice, Worcestershire, sugar and salt. Simmer for another 30 minutes or until meat is tender. Adjust the seasoning according to taste by adding salt, sugar or water. Serve with steaming white...

Giniling na Baboy II

Here is my second version of GINILING NA BABOY. And there will be more variety of Giniling na Baboy recipe that I will be posting. Well, you can do anything with a Giniling na Baboy as long as it has its main ingredients which are ground pork, potatoes and carrots. My first Giniling na Baboy recipe is a party version because it is best to serve that dish for a gathering or a party. But my second version of my Giniling na Baboy is a hushed recipe because it has a mild taste and has no tomato sauce in it, only sauce from annatto seeds or atsuete. If you prefer an easier way of making annatto sauce, you can just simply use atsuete powder and dissolve it in water. This style of Giniling na Baboy is also best with hot pandesal like what we did with our Giniling na Baboy left-over. GINILING NA BABOY II 3 tbsp. annatto seed (atsuete) soaked in 1/2 cup warm water cooking oil 1/2 kilo ground lean pork 3 pieces medium potaotes, peeled and finely chopped 1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped 1 medium red bell pepper, seeds removed and finely chopped sugar salt pepper In a medium skillet, sautee garlic until light brown. Put onions, stir until transluscent. Add ground pork. Sautee until medium cooked, about 5-7 minutes. Meanwhile, squeeze out red color from atsuete by rubbing them with your fingers. Remove seeds from the bowl and pour the red sauce in the pan. Cook for another 5 minutes. Add potatoes, carrots and red bell pepper. Cook until vegetables are soft, leaving about small amount of sauce. Season with salt, pepper and sugar. Serve with steaming white rice or with hot pandesal.  ...

Ginisang Repolyo

GINISANG REPOLYO (Sauteed Cabbage) is one of the cheapest yet healthiest Filipino vegetable dish. Cabbage is usually added to Pinoy meaty soups like Nilagang Baboy and Beef Bulalo. Many loves cabbage for its anti-cancer properties as it can be a rich source of vitamin C. It also has substantial amount of an amino acid called glutamine to help cure acute inflammation. It is low in calorie and usually incorporated in dieting programs. But some hates this vegetable specially to those who have problems with thyroid glands. Some says it is also causes flatulence and stops milk from a breastfeeding moms. Well, we choose what we eat. But as for me, I love this vegetable. You may also try Ginisang Sardinas (Sauteed Sardines with Cabbage) GINISANG REPOLYO 1 tbsp. cooking oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced 1/4 kilo lean ground pork 1/2 kilo cabbage, core removed, sliced into 1 inch strips 1 small carrots, peeled and sliced thinly water ground black pepper fish sauce (optional) salt Boil ground pork in a cup of water and a dash of salt for 10-15 minutes. Separate pork from broth. Set aside. Reserve broth. Place skillet over medium heat. Pour oil. Saute garlic until golden brown. Add onion, saute until transluscent and aroma merged in oil. Add boiled ground pork, stir-fry, about 5 minutes. Season with fish sauce and ground pepper. Add sliced carrots and cabbage. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Then add half cup of water. Adjust flavor by adding water or salt. Cook for 5 more minutes or until cabbage is half-cooked. And remove from fire. Don’t worry having it half-cooked because the remaining heat will let the vegetables to be cooked fully. Serve with hot...

Adobong Pusit

ADOBONG PUSIT (SQUID) was my food nightmare when I was a kid. At first sight, it was horror, a black ink soup with creepy tentacles. It seemed like the dish was unsafe to eat or not something to be eaten at all. But my mom was successful to let me chew and swallow ADOBONG PUSIT. And it happened to be one of my favorite squid dish. I would even prefer cooking ADOBONG PUSIT rather than Calamari. One technique I learned from my friend is to cook the ADOBONG PUSIT with Sprite or 7-up for a sweeter and flavorful dish. ADOBONG PUSIT 1 tbsp. cooking oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 large red onion, peeled and chopped 1 kilo pusit, cleaned, washed and sliced 2 tbsp. soy sauce 2 tbsp. vinegar 1/2 cup sprite or 7-up onion leaves ground pepper salt Heat a large wok or skillet over medium-high heat. Put oil, then saute garlic and onions, about 2 minutes. Add sliced pusit, stirring constantly for 2 minutes. Add soy sauce and sprite or 7-up, ground pepper and salt. Cook for 7-10 minutes. Add vinegar. Adjust flavor by adding salt or vinegar according to taste. Cook for 2-3 minutes. Add onion leaves. Remove from fire. Do not overcook because they will be tough as though you are eating a rubber. Serve with steaming white...

Marble Bread Bar

MARBLE BREAD, for me, has a unique charm and elegance of all the breads in the world. Rightaway, eyes are catched with the beautiful swirl of white and brown combination of vanilla and chocolate bread in one loaf. Making a Marble Bread may seem to be difficult to make but it is just simply a blend of basic vanilla cake batter. Anyway, I am overcoming my frustration of not accomplishing my goal of writing at least thrice a week. It really demands a lot of determination,self-disciple, fatigue and time to sit and write. It may sound as an excuse, but let me. It’s just hard to manage being a wife, mom, entrepreneur, student (yeah, I’m back to school, taking up masters). But my soul really loves to write, though I am not even a good writer. So now, I’m jumping back slowly to what I really want to do, cooking and writing. MARBLE BREAD 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup white sugar 1/2 cup butter, softened 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup milk 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9 inch round pan. Place flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, butter or margarine, eggs, vanilla, and milk into mixing bowl. Beat slowly to moisten, then beat with an electric mixer at medium speed for about 2 minutes until smooth. Reserve 3/4 cup batter; pour the remainder into pan. Stir cocoa into the 3/4 cup reserved batter. Drop by spoonfuls over top of white batter. Using a knife, swirl the cocoa batter into the white batter to incorporate it in a marble effect. Bake in preheated oven for 30 to 35 minutes, until an inserted wooden...

Baked Ziti

I met BAKED ZITI when I was in college. It was when a friend invited me to dine at Sbarro. It was also the very moment I fell in love with Italian Pasta. Every bud on my tongue found the sour tomatoes, pungent onion and overpowering flavor of basil and hundreds of herbs irresistable. Ziti is a 2 inch long tube pasta and is like a traditional macaroni pasta which most Filipinos use. The name ZITI means fiancee and is traditionally served at weddings in Italy. Cooking Baked Ziti is not so famous in the country but good thing Pinoys are now welcoming new tastes and flavors of other cultures’ dishes. BAKED ZITI 1 kilo ziti pasta for pasta sauce: 3 tbsp. cooking oil 3 large white onions, minced 1/2 kilo lean ground beef 1/2 kilo ham, sliced 1 kilo spaghetti sauce 1/4 cup tomato paste, dissolved in 1 cup water 1/2 cup cream cheese 1 tsp. Italian seasoning 1 cup water salt pepper for cream cheese: 2 tbsp. butter 1 cup milk 1/2 cup cream cheese 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated To prepare the Ziti noodles:  Heat a large pot of 3 liters water. Bring to full simmer. Add 2 tablespoon of salt. Add pasta and boil, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until pasta is cooked and firm. Drain the cooked pasta with a colander. wash with running water until pasta is not so warm so as to keep the pasta separated from one another and to reduce the heat to prevent them be starchy. Then, set aside. NOTE: Do not add oil just what most Pinoys use to do when cooking pasta. Adding oil will let your sauce slip of the pasta, instead of letting the pasta absorb the sauce, leaving it flavorless pasta....

Mang Inasal in Dagupan City...

Mang Inasal is now open in Dagupan City! Royce and I were so excited we can barely delay to be at Mang Inasal on opening day. Not because we craved for Mang Inasal’s specialty which is the Chicken Inasal, but we just wanted to check how Dagupeños responded to one of the many food stores that opened recently in the city. Mang Inasal is truly surprising. Though several Chicken Inasal with Unlimited Rice local stores already emerged in the city, still Mang Inasal caught people’s attention as over hundred of people came to dine. As we arrived, we were welcomed with a Dinagyang Festival Dance of Ilo-ilo where the first store was opened. The store was jam-packed and it took us about 20 minutes to be at the counter and have our orders taken. Crowded as it was, the store managed to cope with the flow of the customers as they placed extra tables and chairs outside the store. Again we waited another 20 minutes to grab a table. An added 15 minutes for our meals to be on our tables. It seemed it was a disastrous experience but it surely was a great and successful opening day for Mang Inasal here in Dagupan City. So if you are tired of gobbling burgers and fries, why not try eating something healthy like Mang Inasal’s charcoal grilled chicken marinated in local spices and herbs with rice wrapped in banana leaves and served with steaming Sinigang Soup. Mang Inasal also offers Bangus Sinigang, Beef Sinigang, Bangus Sisig, Pork Sisig, Pork Barbecue, Boneless Bangus, Lumpia Sardines, Mais Con Yelo, Saging Melt, Sago’t Gulaman and many more. Mang Inasal in Dagupan City is located at Metro Plaza, AB Fernandez Avenue, just infront of Dagupan City...

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